Sherwood has exposed undercover policing. Now let’s hear the stories of victims like me | Alison

Sherwood has exposed undercover policing. Now let’s hear the stories of victims like me | Alison

The TV series casts a welcome spotlight on the spy cops scandal, but the real-life racism, sexism and abuse is still unexplored

The BBC crime drama Sherwood signifies the moment our campaign about spy cops abuse has cut through the noise.

Set in a “red wall” former mining community in Nottinghamshire, the main storyline follows a police manhunt for killers on the loose. The writer, James Graham, interlaces this with an intriguing subplot about an undercover police spy who has continued to live under a false identity since having been deployed to monitor the striking miners decades earlier.

Alison is one of eight women who first took legal action against the Metropolitan police over the conduct of undercover officers and a founder member of Police Spies Out of Lives. A core participant in the public inquiry into undercover policing, she is one of the authors of Deep Deception – The Story of the Spycop Network by the Women who Uncovered the Shocking Truth. Twitter: @AlisonSpycops

Do you have an opinion on the issues raised in this article? If you would like to submit a letter of up to 300 words to be considered for publication, email it to us at guardian.letters@theguardian.com

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Sherwood has exposed undercover policing. Now let’s hear the stories of victims like me | Alison

The TV series casts a welcome spotlight on the spy cops scandal, but the real-life racism, sexism and abuse is still unexplored

The BBC crime drama Sherwood signifies the moment our campaign about spy cops abuse has cut through the noise.

Set in a “red wall” former mining community in Nottinghamshire, the main storyline follows a police manhunt for killers on the loose. The writer, James Graham, interlaces this with an intriguing subplot about an undercover police spy who has continued to live under a false identity since having been deployed to monitor the striking miners decades earlier.

Alison is one of eight women who first took legal action against the Metropolitan police over the conduct of undercover officers and a founder member of Police Spies Out of Lives. A core participant in the public inquiry into undercover policing, she is one of the authors of Deep Deception – The Story of the Spycop Network by the Women who Uncovered the Shocking Truth. Twitter: @AlisonSpycops

Do you have an opinion on the issues raised in this article? If you would like to submit a letter of up to 300 words to be considered for publication, email it to us at guardian.letters@theguardian.com

Continue reading…

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Sherwood has exposed undercover policing. Now let’s hear the stories of victims like me | Alison

The TV series casts a welcome spotlight on the spy cops scandal, but the real-life racism, sexism and abuse is still unexplored

The BBC crime drama Sherwood signifies the moment our campaign about spy cops abuse has cut through the noise.

Set in a “red wall” former mining community in Nottinghamshire, the main storyline follows a police manhunt for killers on the loose. The writer, James Graham, interlaces this with an intriguing subplot about an undercover police spy who has continued to live under a false identity since having been deployed to monitor the striking miners decades earlier.

Alison is one of eight women who first took legal action against the Metropolitan police over the conduct of undercover officers and a founder member of Police Spies Out of Lives. A core participant in the public inquiry into undercover policing, she is one of the authors of Deep Deception – The Story of the Spycop Network by the Women who Uncovered the Shocking Truth. Twitter: @AlisonSpycops

Do you have an opinion on the issues raised in this article? If you would like to submit a letter of up to 300 words to be considered for publication, email it to us at guardian.letters@theguardian.com

Continue reading…

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *